Category Archives: English Expression of the Week

English Expression of the Week: get Someone’s Goat

The Expression

This week’s expression is “get someone’s goat.” This expression is very useful if someone is annoying or trying to make you angry.

The Meaning

“Get someone’s goat” means that someone is trying to annoy another person, or to make them angry. We can also say this if we want to say that a situation is annoying or angering.

How do we use it

We use this expression in a sentence. It cannot be used by itself as a complete sentence. We must use this expression with a possessive pronoun or with a person. And of course, don’t forget to use the correct tense.

Easy Examples

That really gets my goat. (Very common for this expression.)

Her barking dog really gets my grandma’s goat.

It will really get william’s goat if he can’t buy that car.

Your Turn

Now it is time to practice. What really gets your goat? Leave a comment and tell me about it.

English Expression of the Week: get Your Money’s Worth

The Expression

this week’s expression is “get your money’s worth.” We use this expression to talk about things that we have bought or will buy.

The Meaning

This expression means that the money we pay for something is a good price. We use it to say that the value we receive is a good value compared to the amount of money we pay for a product or service.

If we use this expression, we are saying that we believe we are not paying too much money.

How do we use it

It is possible to use this expression in any tense. It is usually not used as a complete sentence except as a question, (get your money’s worth?) We can also use it with any pronoun. You will see this in the examples.

Easy Examples

Here are some easy examples to show you how to use this expression.

Did Rosa get her money’s worth from those English lessons?

Make sure you’re getting your money’s worth before you buy a new computer.

I really got my money’s worth this time.

Your Turn

Now it is your turn. to practice. When have you bought something and felt that you have gotten your money’s worth? Have you bought something and felt like you haven’t gotten your money’s worth? Leave a comment to tell me and practice using this expression. And watch the video for more examples.

English Expression of the Week: get the Willies

The Expression The expression for this week is “get the willies.” It is not a phrasal verb, but “get” must be changed for the correct tense.

The Meaning

“Get the willies” means to be nervous or scared because of a place or situation. A person can get the willies from many different situations. this expression can mean that you are really nervous or scared, and it can also mean that you are only a little nervous.

How do we use it

We cannot use this expression to make a whole sentence. It must be put in a sentence with other words so that it makes sense. You will see in the examples. this expression is very informal, so you must not use it in a business letter or in a very formal talk.

Easy Examples

I’m getting the willies.

I get the willies every time I pass that house.

She gets the willies from reading mystery books at night.

Your Turn

Now it’s time to practice. Have you ever gotten the willies? Do you get them often? Leave a comment to tell me about it. And watch the video for more examples.

English Expression of the Week: get a raw Deal

The Expression

The expression for this week is “get a raw deal.” It is not a phrasal verb, but the verb “get” must change to go with the correct tense.

The Meaning

“Get” in this case means to receive, “raw” in this case means “bad” or “unjust,” and “deal” in this case means “situation” or “management.” Can you already guess a little about the meaning? Get a raw deal” means that something happens to you that is unjust or bad. It means that a situation is managed badly.

How do we use it

We use “get a raw deal” when we want to talk about treating someone badly. It is usually used when we talk about a situation with the police, the law court, or administration. We use it when the situation is bad and when we think that the result is wrong.

Easy Examples

here are 3 examples.

You really got a raw deal.

Jenny says she always gets a raw deal from her boss.

They don’t want to go to the police because they think they’ll just get a raw deal.

Your Turn

Have you ever gotten a raw deal? Leave a comment and tell me about it. And don’t forget to use the expression in your explanation. you can also watch the video if you want some more examples that you can listen to and repeat.

English Expression of the Week: get the Picture

The Expression

the expression for this week is “get the picture.” It is connected with using the word “get” to mean “understand.”

The Meaning

“Get the picture” means to understand something. It usually means to understand an idea, concept, or a situation.

How do we use it

We use this expression to ask if someone understands what we are explaining. We also use it to emphasize that we think someone understands. When we are asking if someone gets the picture, we can use this expression as it’s own sentence.

Easy Examples

Here are some examples of using “get the picture.”

I don’t want to own any more credit cards and I never will. Get the picture. (The unspoken idea is “So stop calling me.”)

Sometimes my students get the picture quickly when I explain a grammar point.

I could give more examples, but I think you get the picture.

Special Notes

I need to make 2 special notes about this expression. First, you should be careful about your tone when you use this expression to ask if someone gets the picture. If you say it with an angry tone, it sounds very rude. This is also true if you ask this question of someone who is much older than you or someone who is your boss. Look at my second example, and you will get the picture. The second special note is that you must be careful about the context. Sometimes “get the picture is used to talk about photography. I have just checked Google and this expression is used in the names of several photography-related companies. So in some cases, “get the picture” really talks about pictures.

Your Turn

Do you get the picture of how to use this expression? Leave a comment with your own examples below. And you can also watch the video if you want to practice listening to and repeating the expression.

 

English Expression of the Week: get the hang of

The Expression

the expression for this week is “get the hang of.” It is a phrasal verb, so be careful about the tenses.

The Meaning

“Get the hang of” means to understand how to do something that you are learning.

How do we use it

We use this expression as a part of a sentence. We cannot use it in a sentence by itself. And as I said before, we have to be careful to use the correct tense.

Easy Examples

Here are some easy examples for using this phrasal verb.

You will get the hang of English.

I finally got the hang of using a Mac.

Dana’s getting the hang of being a mother.

your Turn

The only way to really get the hang of English is to practice. So now it’s your turn to get a little practice and leave a comment below with your own examples of using “get the hang of.” You can also watch the video for more examples that you will be able to listen to and repeat.

 

English Expression of the Week: Take a Stab at

The Expression

The expression for this week is “take a stab at.” It is a phrasal verb like “try your hand at.”

The Meaning

“Take a stab at” means to try something. It usually means to try something for the first time.

How do we Use it

We use this expression as part of a sentence. We cannot use it by itself. Also, we do not usually use it at the end of a sentence. Also, just like any verb, we have to be careful to use the correct tense.

Easy Examples

Here are some easy examples for you to practice with.

I don’t know if I can make a blanket, but I’ll take a stab at it.

I took a stab at learning Russian.

Don’t give up. Take another stab at it.

Your Turn

Now it’s your chance to take a stab at using this English expression. Leave a comment with your own examples. And if you want more practice, watch the video below.

 

English Expression of the Week: Give it a Shot

The Expression

The expression for this week is “give it a shot.” I am sure you have heard it in English movies or on podcasts.

the Meaning

“Give it a shot” means to try something. But it does not always mean to try something for the first time.

How do we use it

This expression is used as a sentence, or as part of a sentence. And if we want to use it to talk about trying something again, we add the word “another” to the expression.

Easy Examples

Here are some examples to show you how to use the expression.

“I’m not sure I can do it.” “Come on. Give it a shot.”

I’m going to just give it a shot and see if it works.

I failed last time, but I’ve been practicing. I’m going to give it another shot.

Your Turn

So come on and give it a shot. Leave a comment with your own examples. And if you want more examples that you can see and hear, watch the video below.

 

The Expression

The expression for this week is “give it a shot.” I am sure you have heard it in English movies or on podcasts.

the Meaning

“Give it a shot” means to try something. But it does not always mean to try something for the first time.

How do we use it

This expression is used as a sentence, or as part of a sentence. And if we want to use it to talk about trying something again, we add the word “another” to the expression.

Easy Examples

Here are some examples to show you how to use the expression.

“I’m not sure I can do it.” “Come on. Give it a shot.”

I’m going to just give it a shot and see if it works.

I failed last time, but I’ve been practicing. I’m going to give it another shot.

Your Turn

So come on and give it a shot. Leave a comment with your own examples. And if you want more examples that you can see and hear, watch the video below.

English Expression of the Week: Test the Waters

The Expression

The expression for this week is “test the waters.” It is not a phrasal verb, and it must be changed to fit the tense you are speaking in.

The Meaning

“Test the waters” means to try something in a small way. Just like “try your hand at,” it usually means to try something for the first time.

How do we use it

We use this expression as a sentence, or as part of a sentence. And, as I said above, the tense must be correct.

Examples

Here are some easy examples to practice. Try reading them out loud so you can get used to how this expression sounds.

If you’re not sure you will like web design, just test the waters.

When I was younger, I tested the waters and realized that teaching English was a good career for me.

You don’t have to start speaking English in big crowds. Test the waters. Speak to yourself in a mirror.

Your Turn

Now it’s your turn to practice. If you want to see and here more examples, watch the video. Then leave a comment with your own examples. Why not test the waters and see if you can use this expression today.

 

English Expression of the Week: Try Your Hand at

The Expression

The expression for this week is “try your hand at.” In this case, the expression is actually a phrasal verb, a verb that is made of several words.

Meaning

This phrasal verb means to try a new activity. It usually talks about a new hobby or a new project.

How to use it

We use this phrasal verb with most of the pronouns: my, your, his, her, our, their. but the plural pronouns are less common. We use this phrasal verb with gerunds, which are nouns made from verbs. And we will also sometimes use it with regular nouns. “Try your hand at” does not always take an object. It is sometimes used at the end of a sentence.

Examples

Here are some easy examples.

I’m going to try my hand at sculpting.

He has decided to try his hand at using a Mac.

I want to find something new to try my hand at.

your turn:

here are two ways for extra practice. Watch the video below for a spoken explanation and some examples that you can listen to and repeat. And you can add your own examples in the comments if you would like to try your hand at using this phrasal verb in English.